.header-container, .body-container, .footer-container { max-width: 1080px; margin: 0 auto;

DELOACH BLOG

Decarbonation of Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jun 20, 2023 11:26:13 AM

Requires an application commonly referred to as either “Degasification” or "Decarbonation" and it requires the use of a piece of water treatment equipment called either a “degasifier” or a “decarbonator”.

Both of these are similar in nature and are designed for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) removal from the incoming water. A properly designed decarbonator can remove 99.99% of the free carbon dioxide gas that is present in the water stream. One of the primary reasons for utilizing a decarbonator or degasifier for the removal of carbon dioxide gas is the raise the pH of the water without the need to add caustic. resulting in high-purity water.

The other reason is the remove the CO2 prior to treating the water with Ion Exchange which utilizes Anion or Cation resins to reduce the regeneration cycles for the resin beds. High concentrations of CO2 consume the ion charge within the resins and require more frequent regeneration cycles. The difference between anion and cation resins is that one is positively charged (anion) and the other is negatively charged (cation), cation resins, attract positive ions with their negative charge.

The term decarbonation describes the process of the removal of suspended gas or the conversion of carbonic acids into free Carbon Dioxide. Carbonic Acid (H2CO3) is stable at normal ambient anhydrous conditions. However, Carbonic Acid decomposes when not stable and in the presence of any water molecules to form carbon dioxide (CO2).  The Carbonic acid breaks down when present in water and it is converted to a gas based upon certain conditions. It is common to have CO2 present in water requiring a decarbonation process when utilizing certain types of water filtration such as membrane filtration with reverse osmosis or it can be present when the need to adjust pH is required. When removing (CO2) the process is often referred to as “Decarbonation”, when removing (H2S) Hydrogen Sulfide the process is often referred to as “Degasification”. 

Read More

Topics: water treatment issues, degasification, pH levels of water, aeration, iron oxidation, water treatment, water plant, bicarbonate, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, dissolved gases, De-Aeration, wastewater, carbon dioxide, oxygen, decarbonator, degasifier, gases, carbonic acid, H2S Degasifier

Decarbonation the Removal of CO2 from Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jun 19, 2023 3:10:22 PM

The Basics of Water Decarbonation

and the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). The need to remove (CO2) is essential in most Aquaculture, Municipal, Industrial, and Food & Beverage Processes To understand you must familiarize yourself with Henry’s Law.

Henry's Law defines the method and proportional relationship between the amount of a gas in a solution in relation to the gas's partial pressure in the atmosphere. Often you will see and hear various terms like degasification, decarbonation, aeration, and even air stripping when discussing the removal of dissolved gases and other convertible elements from water. Understanding the impacts that Carbon Dioxide (CO2) can have on both equipment and aquatic life provides the basic reasons why the need to decarbonate water, exists. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) can exist naturally in the raw water supply or be the result of ph control and balance. In either case, the process called Decarbonation or Degasification provides the most cost-effective and efficient manner to reduce or tally remove (CO2) from the water. In addition to Carbon Dioxide (CO2), water can contain a variety of other contaminants that may impact the removal efficiency of the Carbon Dioxide. A variety of elements as well as dissolved gases such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide (CO2). A full analytical review of the water chemistry is required to properly design and size the “Water Treatment” process.

Breaking the bonds in water releases a dissolved gas

such as carbon dioxide (CO2) you must change the conditions of the vapor pressure surrounding the gas and allow the gas to be removed.  There are many variables to consider when designing or calculating the “means and methods” of the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). When I refer to the means and methods. I am referring to the design of a decarbonator and its components. The means equals the size and type (Hydraulic load) of the decarbonator and the “method” equals the additional variables such as the cubic foot of airflow (CFM) and “Ratio” of the air to water to accomplish the proportional condition needed to remove the carbon dioxide (CO2).

Read More

Topics: water treatment issues, degasification, pH levels of water, aeration, iron oxidation, water treatment, water plant, bicarbonate, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, dissolved gases, De-Aeration, wastewater, carbon dioxide, oxygen, degasifier, gases, carbonic acid, H2S Degasifier, removal of CO2 from water

The Impact of PFOAs Regulation on Environmental Safety

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Apr 19, 2023 8:30:00 AM

I will explore the potential risks of exposure to two members of a family of man-made chemicals called PFAS.

These chemicals are PFOA and PFOS, "poly-fluoroalkyl substances."


I will discuss the sources of PFOA and PFOS. These include leaching from industrial sites, the use of consumer products, and food and water contamination.

I will also discuss the exposure pathways of PFOA and PFOS. I will examine the regulations and guidelines for the use of these chemicals. I will also investigate their impact on the environment and various industries.

I will guide how to limit exposure to PFOA and PFOS and protect oneself from potential health risks. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been primary environmental safety concerns raised recently. There may be short and long-term human health effects.

This guide covers the potential risks of pfo's and pfoa's. It explains their sources and exposure pathways. It also looks at regulations and guidelines for their usage and impact on the environment and industries.

Introduction to PFOA and PFOS

Read More

Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, FDA, Safe drinking water, wastewater, Global, RO system, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, PFA's, DeLoach Industries, Cosmetics, make-up, water process system, removing PFAS & PFOS, pfas exposure, health effects of pfas, nonstick cookware, wastewater treatment system, water treatment standards, PFOS, safe drinking water act, pfoa regulations, the environmental protection agency, drinking water standards, adverse health effects, water resistant clothing, environmental safety

Water & Wastewater Process Standards vs. Red Tide

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Apr 13, 2023 8:09:43 PM

One of the most pressing issues that we face today is the phenomenon of red tide.

Red tide is algae bloom that can cause serious harm to marine life and humans.

In this article, I will explore what red tide is, what causes it, and its impact on Florida. Most importantly, the role of wastewater treatment in helping to prevent it.

What is Red Tide?

Red tide is a natural phenomenon that occurs when certain species of algae grow out of control. These algae produce toxins that harm marine life and humans. The term "red tide" comes from the reddish-brown color that the water takes on when the algae bloom. The bloom can happen in any part of the world in warm, coastal waters.

What Causes Red Tide? 

Various factors cause these harmful algae to bloom.

  • Changes in water temperature
  • Nutrient pollution
  • Ocean currents

The most common cause is nutrient pollution. Nutrient pollution occurs when excess nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus enter the water. These nutrients can come from agricultural runoff, sewage from residential drain fields, inefficient wastewater treatment plants, septic tanks, and fertilizer.

Red Tide Blooms in Florida - History and Impact.

Florida has a long history of deadly algae blooms. The state experiences red tide almost every year, lasting for months.

It devastates the state's marine life, including fish, sea turtles, and dolphins. The algae produce toxins that can kill these animals. The dead fish can wash up on shore, causing beachgoers an unpleasant odor and an eyesore.

How Do These Microscopic Algae Affect Marine Life?

It affects marine life in a variety of ways. The algae's toxins can cause respiratory problems and neurological issues.

With most coastal outbreaks, the loss of marine life is significant. It produces toxins and decreases oxygen levels, another contributing factor to marine animal fatalities. Red tide disrupts the entire ecosystem and has been increasing in both frequencies of outbreaks as well as areas impacted.

How Does Red Tide Impact Humans?

Read More

Topics: water treatment issues, water treatment, wastewater, DeLoach Industries, water process system, red tide, wastewater treatment plants, red tide in florida, wastewater treatment system, cause of red tide, water temperature, marine life, wastewater treatment infrastructure, benefits of wastewater treatment, water treatment standards

How to Remove Nanoparticles from Your Drinking Water‍

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 22, 2022 1:14:33 PM

If you’ve been reading the news lately, you know nanoparticles are not so great. In everything from cosmetics to water filters, nanoparticles have been shown to cause various health problems. But what exactly are nanoparticles, and how can you protect yourself from their harmful effects? Let’s answer these questions and more with this quick guide on removing nanoparticles from your drinking water.

Read More

Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, About DeLoach Industries, water plant, safety, Safe drinking water, Global, distillation, RO membrane, RO system, particulate matter, filters, municipal water systems, residential well water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, Clean Water, Water Test, Water Test Kit, DeLoach Industries, technology, minerals, temperature, nanoparticles, Cosmetics, Nano, make-up, organ function, contaminants, pressure filters, reverse osmosis, carbon filters, UV filters, activated carbon

A Quick Guide to Polymer 3D Printing Technology

Posted by Daniel DiDomenico on Jul 12, 2022 1:00:00 PM

3D printing is a technology that has only recently become commercially available.

Progress in the last decade has allowed the equipment to excel tremendously.

3D print technology was started in 1987 by 3D Systems Corporation. The technology gained traction in the early 2010s. 3D printing is a type of additive manufacturing that creates three-dimensional parts. By successively adding material layer by layer until the part is complete.

To create the part, a 3D CAD model is required. The potential of 3D printing has led to a wide variety of technologies on the market. This blog will go into depth on the most prevalent types of 3D printing and their applications.

Figure: Direct side-by-side comparison of the three polymer 3D print technologies discussed in this blog.

Read More

Topics: water treatment, DeLoach Industries, Inc., 3D CAD, software, 3D, DeLoach Industries, 3D parametric, dimensions, technology, 2D CAD, parametric, nylon, abrasion, printer, sls, Polymer, geometries, printing, prototyping, interlocking, 3D technology, interior, Polylactic Acid, Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, Isotropic

Treating Noxious Fumes with an Odor Control Scrubber Tower

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on May 24, 2022 1:00:00 PM

Odor control in a manufacturing facility is essential.

It prevents potential health risks and discomfort caused by the spread of chemicals, vapors, and fumes. Additionally, excessive vapors can hinder the efficiency of exhaust and natural ventilation systems.

One effective solution for addressing odor issues is the installation of an Odor Control Scrubber Tower. These towers are part of the ventilation system in manufacturing plants and chemical processing facilities.

Odor control scrubbers help to remove noxious fumes and odors from exhaust and air streams. This is an effective way to improve air quality. This process involves utilizing an activated carbon filter and an ionic air filter

Key Considerations for Installing an Odor Control Scrubber Tower:

Health and Safety of Workers:

Industrial environments pose risks of exposure to hazardous fumes and gases for workers. Unhealthy odors emitted in high concentrations can jeopardize their well-being and safety. In some cases, these gases may even be combustible, adding an extra level of danger.

Odor control scrubber towers remove gases from the contaminated air, ensuring a safe working environment. These towers reduce the risk of health issues such as nausea, headaches, allergy symptoms, eye irritation, and loss of consciousness. This helps maintain worker productivity and prevents sickness caused by toxic fumes and gases.

Read More

Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, odor control, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, biological scrubber, water plant, safety, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), Chemical Odor, caustic, Safe drinking water, wastewater, gases, Biological Odor Control Scrubber, Biological odor control, what is a scrubber, municipal water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Clean Water, Industrial Odor Control

How to Remove PFAS from Drinking Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on May 4, 2022 1:05:00 PM

If you’ve been following the news, you know a growing problem with PFAS (per and poly-fluoroalkyl substances).

These man-made chemicals are found in everything from clothing to food packaging. While they are inexpensive and stable in products, some tend to break down into other substances, such as PFAS-methyl tetrahydrofuran. PFASs have been discovered in drinking water nationwide, including in parts of the country with very high water tables. As a result, it’s essential to learn how to remove PFAS from water. What should you do if you suspect that there’s a problem with your water? Check the source of the water, test it, and treat it if necessary.

Follow these steps on how to remove PFAs from drinking water.

Test Your Water

Although it’s essential to know how to remove contaminants in general, it’s even more important to know how to test your water for contamination. A water test kit can help you determine whether there are contaminants in your water and whether they are at a dangerous level. You can purchase water test kits at grocery stores, hardware stores, and online retailers. Generally, these kits come with the standard set of tests for a home water filtration system, but they also often include tests for specific contaminants. Use these tests to determine whether your water is safe to drink. If your water contains contaminants, you need to remove them from your water source. This can be done by digging a more bottomless well, installing a water filtration system, or getting a water purification system. If your water does not contain contaminants, you don’t need to do anything except continue drinking your water.

Check the Source

The easiest way to find the source of your contaminated water is by checking the water meter. The meter tracks how much water you use, and if your water comes from a well or water treatment facility, it will show you when the water was most recently used. From there, you can go down to the water source and see if it is coming up contaminated. Most well owners aren’t aware of their water source, and it’s essential to check the water meter to find the source. If you find your water source is contaminated, you may be able to improve your situation by decreasing the distance between the source and your house so that less water passes through the source. Alternatively, you may want to find a new, cleaner source.

Read More

Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, odor control, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, Chemical Odor, Safe drinking water, RO system, filters, Filter Media, residential well water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., backwash, Carbon Filter, Micron Filter, Drinking Water, Clean Water, Contaminated Water, Water Source, Sediment Filter, PFA's, Water Test, Water Test Kit

What Is Water Turbidity?

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Mar 18, 2022 1:05:00 PM

Water turbidity refers to how transparent or translucent the water is when examining or testing it for any use.

 Water turbidity can impact food and beverage, municipal, industrial, and aquaculture operations. Turbidity is caused by suspended or dissolved particles in the water that scatter light which causes the water to appear cloudy or even murky.

Different particles can cause turbidity, including sediments such as silts and clay, fine inorganic or organic matter, algae or soluble colored organic compounds, and microscopic organisms. Turbidity is measured in a value referred to as NTU, which means Nephelometric Turbidity Unit. The EPA requires a turbidity level no higher than 0.3 NTU in the USA, and if a member of the partnership of safe drinking water, then the level must not exceed 0.1 NTU.

High turbidity can create habitats for other harmful elements, such as bacteria or metals, that can accumulate onto the particles. This increases the health risk for a potable water system. In aquaculture operations, increased turbidity from silts and sediments can harm and harm marine life, so it must be removed to safe levels. For the food and beverage industry, the impact of high turbidity can be both a safety concern and a visual and noticeable quality concern because if the turbidity is high, it can alter the physical look of the final product, for example, a distillery.

Read More

Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, Safe drinking water, De-Aeration, decarbonator, Aqua Farming, Fish Farming, Aquaculture, Pisciculture, Deagasification, particulate matter, filters, Sand filters, municipal water systems, industrial facilities, DeLoach Industries, Inc., turbidity

What is Water Demineralization?

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jan 27, 2022 12:54:16 PM

Water demineralization is also called deionization and is a process known as “Ion Exchange.”

In simple terms, water demineralization is “Water Purification.” The process involves removing dissolved ionic mineral solids from a feed-water process, typically for “Industrial” water applications. Still, it can also be utilized to remove dissolved solids from a water process for “Aquaculture,” “Food and Beverage,” and the “Municipal” markets.

Why is demineralization utilized? It can remove dissolved solids to near distilled water quality at a much lower capital and operational cost than other treatment processes such as membrane softening (Reverse Osmosis). Demineralization applies the science known as “Ion Exchange,” which attracts negative and positive charged ions and allows either to attach themselves to a negative ion depending on their respective current negative or positive charge during what is known as a resin cycle. In other technical articles, we will explore and go into more specific details on the science of the ion exchange process. Water that has dissolved salts and minerals has ions, either negatively charged ions known as “Anions” or positively charged ions known as “Cations.” To treat the water and remove these contaminants, the ions in the water are attracted to counter-ions, which have a negative charge. In a demineralization treatment process, there are pressure vessels that hold resin beads which are typically made of plastic. The beads are made from a plastic material with an ionic functional group that allows them to hold and maintain an electrostatic electrical charge. Some of these resin groups are negatively charged, referred to as “Anion” resins, while others hold a positive charge and are called “Cations” resins.

There are different applications to apply Ion exchange technologies, which is why you will often hear different terminology interchanged like deionization and demineralization. The raw water quality and the specific application will dictate the type of ion exchange process needed. For example, if the water contains a high level of hardness, the water will most likely contain Ca2+ or Mg2+ dissolved solids possessing a positive charge. To replace these hard ions, it is typical to utilize a resin bed with a salt ion like Na+. As the water passes over the resin bead material within the pressure vessel. The hard ions are replaced with the salt ion; therefore, all the hardness within the water is removed. However, the water will now contain a higher concentration of sodium ions, and this must be considered during the evaluation and selection process of the type of resin material to utilize for the specific application. If the water application requires high purity and the removal of as many solids as possible, then the term or process selected is referred to as demineralization.

Read More

Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), media packing, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, decarbonator, degasifier, RO system, H2S Degasifier, Aquaculture, degassed water, Co2 ph, removal of CO2 from water, Deagasification, decarbonation of water, hydrogen ion, particulate matter, municipal water systems, industrial facilities, automated control systems, Ion exchange, cations, anions

Subscribe to our blog

Recent Posts