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DELOACH BLOG

PFOA and PFOS Removal by Membrane and Filtration Treatment

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Aug 10, 2023 2:04:26 PM

In recent years, PFOA and PFOS, commonly known as "forever chemicals," have raised concerns among municipalities, food and beverage industries, and commercial facilities in the USA and around the globe. These synthetic chemicals, which never break down and pose significant health risks, have been detected in water, food supplies, and even bottled purified water. As new EPA regulations take effect in 2024, industries are searching for effective and cost-efficient methods to remove these hazardous substances from their water supply. Fortunately, advanced water purification technologies such as microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis can address these challenges.

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Topics: water quality, advanced treatment solutions, Safe drinking water, RO system, municipal water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, DeLoach Industries, reverse osmosis, water process system, removing PFAS & PFOS, pfas exposure, health effects of pfas, exposure to pfas, water treatment standards, PFOS, safe drinking water act, the environmental protection agency, drinking water standards, forever chemicals, water purification systems, microfiltration and ultrafiltration, potable water, membrane technology, types of membranes, flat sheet, spirally wound

Regulations for PFOA and PFOS Chemicals

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 20, 2023 11:30:00 AM

PFOA and PFOS are man-made chemicals used in various products to simplify life. 

Forever chemicals, also known as synthetic chemicals called PFAS, have gained recognition. Scientists created these chemicals to make products resistant to water, stains, and sticking. The United States initially utilized them in the 1950s.

DuPont introduced Teflon in the 1950s to help Americans have nonstick cookware and make their lives easier. Americans and people from other countries liked this new improvement and soon used these substances in many different products.

These chemicals are resistant to water and lipids, so they don't break down and last a long time in the environment.

Over time, companies have used these chemicals in manufacturing various products, such as firefighting foam, food packaging, and cosmetics. As a result, these chemicals have entered the air, water, soil, and food production. They discontinued the use of PFAS and their other compounds in the mid-1970s.

People believe that contamination has affected more than 7000 metric tons of Fluorochemicals. PFOAs and PFOS, which can cause various health problems, have exposed many Americans and people in the USA.

PFOA chemicals contaminated 1% of public drinking water supply systems in 2016. The EPA did not regulate safe levels of PFOA and PFOS in drinking water systems for many years.

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Topics: water quality, advanced treatment solutions, pH levels, Safe drinking water, RO system, particulate matter, Filter Media, municipal water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, Clean Water, PFA's, DeLoach Industries, nylon, Cosmetics, reverse osmosis, water process system, removing PFAS & PFOS, pfas exposure, health effects of pfas, exposure to pfas, nonstick cookware, food packaging, water treatment standards, PFOS, safe drinking water act, pfoa regulations, the environmental protection agency, drinking water standards, water resistant clothing, environmental safety, forever chemicals

The Impact of PFOAs Regulation on Environmental Safety

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Apr 19, 2023 8:30:00 AM

I will explore the potential risks of exposure to two members of a family of man-made chemicals called PFAS.

These chemicals are PFOA and PFOS, "poly-fluoroalkyl substances."


I will discuss the sources of PFOA and PFOS. These include leaching from industrial sites, the use of consumer products, and food and water contamination.

I will also discuss the exposure pathways of PFOA and PFOS. I will examine the regulations and guidelines for the use of these chemicals. I will also investigate their impact on the environment and various industries.

I will guide how to limit exposure to PFOA and PFOS and protect oneself from potential health risks. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been primary environmental safety concerns raised recently. There may be short and long-term human health effects.

This guide covers the potential risks of pfo's and pfoa's. It explains their sources and exposure pathways. It also looks at regulations and guidelines for their usage and impact on the environment and industries.

Introduction to PFOA and PFOS

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, FDA, Safe drinking water, wastewater, Global, RO system, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, PFA's, DeLoach Industries, Cosmetics, make-up, water process system, removing PFAS & PFOS, pfas exposure, health effects of pfas, nonstick cookware, wastewater treatment system, water treatment standards, PFOS, safe drinking water act, pfoa regulations, the environmental protection agency, drinking water standards, adverse health effects, water resistant clothing, environmental safety

Avoiding Exposure to PFAS

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jan 31, 2023 10:43:25 AM

PFAS, or 'the forever chemicals, due to their long-lasting nature, are present in nonstick cookware, food packaging, and stain repellents and can cause health issues. Knowing the sources, making conscious decisions about products, limiting processed and packaged foods, and opting for safer alternatives are essential. You can protect yourself and your family from potential harm through these steps.

 What is PFAS?

PFAS are a class of chemical substances used in various commercial and industrial applications, including nonstick cookware, stain repellents, and food packaging.

There are two main types of PFAS:

  • Traditional PFAS
  • Next-generation PFAS (also known as 'long-chain' PFAS).

Traditional PFAS include perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), which have been phased out in the United States due to health concerns.

Next-generation PFAS such as perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) have also been identified as contaminants in drinking water and other consumer products. Unfortunately, next-generation PFAS are not regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Health effects of PFAS

PFAS exposure at low levels can cause a few health risks and medical conditions, such as weakened immunity, thyroid issues, and cancer. Research is ongoing to see if it can impact fetus/baby growth and development, but these results are not definitive. Pregnant women can pass on PFAS to their fetuses, which could hurt the infant's health. Also, children exposed to PFAS in their young years may be at a higher risk for getting ADHD in the future.

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Topics: water quality, advanced treatment solutions, Safe drinking water, Global, distillation, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, Clean Water, Contaminated Water, PFA's, Water Test, Water Test Kit, DeLoach Industries, make-up, removing PFAS & PFOS, pfas exposure, health effects of pfas, exposure to pfas, nonstick cookware, food packaging

How to Remove Nanoparticles from Your Drinking Water‍

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 22, 2022 1:14:33 PM

If you’ve been reading the news lately, you know nanoparticles are not so great. In everything from cosmetics to water filters, nanoparticles have been shown to cause various health problems. But what exactly are nanoparticles, and how can you protect yourself from their harmful effects? Let’s answer these questions and more with this quick guide on removing nanoparticles from your drinking water.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, About DeLoach Industries, water plant, safety, Safe drinking water, Global, distillation, RO membrane, RO system, particulate matter, filters, municipal water systems, residential well water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, Clean Water, Water Test, Water Test Kit, DeLoach Industries, technology, minerals, temperature, nanoparticles, Cosmetics, Nano, make-up, organ function, contaminants, pressure filters, reverse osmosis, carbon filters, UV filters, activated carbon

Treating Noxious Fumes with an Odor Control Scrubber Tower

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on May 24, 2022 1:00:00 PM

Odor control in a manufacturing facility is essential.

It prevents potential health risks and discomfort caused by the spread of chemicals, vapors, and fumes. Additionally, excessive vapors can hinder the efficiency of exhaust and natural ventilation systems.

One effective solution for addressing odor issues is the installation of an Odor Control Scrubber Tower. These towers are part of the ventilation system in manufacturing plants and chemical processing facilities.

Odor control scrubbers help to remove noxious fumes and odors from exhaust and air streams. This is an effective way to improve air quality. This process involves utilizing an activated carbon filter and an ionic air filter

Key Considerations for Installing an Odor Control Scrubber Tower:

Health and Safety of Workers:

Industrial environments pose risks of exposure to hazardous fumes and gases for workers. Unhealthy odors emitted in high concentrations can jeopardize their well-being and safety. In some cases, these gases may even be combustible, adding an extra level of danger.

Odor control scrubber towers remove gases from the contaminated air, ensuring a safe working environment. These towers reduce the risk of health issues such as nausea, headaches, allergy symptoms, eye irritation, and loss of consciousness. This helps maintain worker productivity and prevents sickness caused by toxic fumes and gases.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, odor control, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, biological scrubber, water plant, safety, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), Chemical Odor, caustic, Safe drinking water, wastewater, gases, Biological Odor Control Scrubber, Biological odor control, what is a scrubber, municipal water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Clean Water, Industrial Odor Control

How to Remove PFAS from Drinking Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on May 4, 2022 1:05:00 PM

If you’ve been following the news, you know a growing problem with PFAS (per and poly-fluoroalkyl substances).

These man-made chemicals are found in everything from clothing to food packaging. While they are inexpensive and stable in products, some tend to break down into other substances, such as PFAS-methyl tetrahydrofuran. PFASs have been discovered in drinking water nationwide, including in parts of the country with very high water tables. As a result, it’s essential to learn how to remove PFAS from water. What should you do if you suspect that there’s a problem with your water? Check the source of the water, test it, and treat it if necessary.

Follow these steps on how to remove PFAs from drinking water.

Test Your Water

Although it’s essential to know how to remove contaminants in general, it’s even more important to know how to test your water for contamination. A water test kit can help you determine whether there are contaminants in your water and whether they are at a dangerous level. You can purchase water test kits at grocery stores, hardware stores, and online retailers. Generally, these kits come with the standard set of tests for a home water filtration system, but they also often include tests for specific contaminants. Use these tests to determine whether your water is safe to drink. If your water contains contaminants, you need to remove them from your water source. This can be done by digging a more bottomless well, installing a water filtration system, or getting a water purification system. If your water does not contain contaminants, you don’t need to do anything except continue drinking your water.

Check the Source

The easiest way to find the source of your contaminated water is by checking the water meter. The meter tracks how much water you use, and if your water comes from a well or water treatment facility, it will show you when the water was most recently used. From there, you can go down to the water source and see if it is coming up contaminated. Most well owners aren’t aware of their water source, and it’s essential to check the water meter to find the source. If you find your water source is contaminated, you may be able to improve your situation by decreasing the distance between the source and your house so that less water passes through the source. Alternatively, you may want to find a new, cleaner source.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, odor control, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, Chemical Odor, Safe drinking water, RO system, filters, Filter Media, residential well water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., backwash, Carbon Filter, Micron Filter, Drinking Water, Clean Water, Contaminated Water, Water Source, Sediment Filter, PFA's, Water Test, Water Test Kit

What Is Water Turbidity?

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Mar 18, 2022 1:05:00 PM

Water turbidity refers to how transparent or translucent the water is when examining or testing it for any use.

 Water turbidity can impact food and beverage, municipal, industrial, and aquaculture operations. Turbidity is caused by suspended or dissolved particles in the water that scatter light which causes the water to appear cloudy or even murky.

Different particles can cause turbidity, including sediments such as silts and clay, fine inorganic or organic matter, algae or soluble colored organic compounds, and microscopic organisms. Turbidity is measured in a value referred to as NTU, which means Nephelometric Turbidity Unit. The EPA requires a turbidity level no higher than 0.3 NTU in the USA, and if a member of the partnership of safe drinking water, then the level must not exceed 0.1 NTU.

High turbidity can create habitats for other harmful elements, such as bacteria or metals, that can accumulate onto the particles. This increases the health risk for a potable water system. In aquaculture operations, increased turbidity from silts and sediments can harm and harm marine life, so it must be removed to safe levels. For the food and beverage industry, the impact of high turbidity can be both a safety concern and a visual and noticeable quality concern because if the turbidity is high, it can alter the physical look of the final product, for example, a distillery.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, Safe drinking water, De-Aeration, decarbonator, Aqua Farming, Fish Farming, Aquaculture, Pisciculture, Deagasification, particulate matter, filters, Sand filters, municipal water systems, industrial facilities, DeLoach Industries, Inc., turbidity

What is Water Demineralization?

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jan 27, 2022 12:54:16 PM

Water demineralization is also called deionization and is a process known as “Ion Exchange.”

In simple terms, water demineralization is “Water Purification.” The process involves removing dissolved ionic mineral solids from a feed-water process, typically for “Industrial” water applications. Still, it can also be utilized to remove dissolved solids from a water process for “Aquaculture,” “Food and Beverage,” and the “Municipal” markets.

Why is demineralization utilized? It can remove dissolved solids to near distilled water quality at a much lower capital and operational cost than other treatment processes such as membrane softening (Reverse Osmosis). Demineralization applies the science known as “Ion Exchange,” which attracts negative and positive charged ions and allows either to attach themselves to a negative ion depending on their respective current negative or positive charge during what is known as a resin cycle. In other technical articles, we will explore and go into more specific details on the science of the ion exchange process. Water that has dissolved salts and minerals has ions, either negatively charged ions known as “Anions” or positively charged ions known as “Cations.” To treat the water and remove these contaminants, the ions in the water are attracted to counter-ions, which have a negative charge. In a demineralization treatment process, there are pressure vessels that hold resin beads which are typically made of plastic. The beads are made from a plastic material with an ionic functional group that allows them to hold and maintain an electrostatic electrical charge. Some of these resin groups are negatively charged, referred to as “Anion” resins, while others hold a positive charge and are called “Cations” resins.

There are different applications to apply Ion exchange technologies, which is why you will often hear different terminology interchanged like deionization and demineralization. The raw water quality and the specific application will dictate the type of ion exchange process needed. For example, if the water contains a high level of hardness, the water will most likely contain Ca2+ or Mg2+ dissolved solids possessing a positive charge. To replace these hard ions, it is typical to utilize a resin bed with a salt ion like Na+. As the water passes over the resin bead material within the pressure vessel. The hard ions are replaced with the salt ion; therefore, all the hardness within the water is removed. However, the water will now contain a higher concentration of sodium ions, and this must be considered during the evaluation and selection process of the type of resin material to utilize for the specific application. If the water application requires high purity and the removal of as many solids as possible, then the term or process selected is referred to as demineralization.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), media packing, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, decarbonator, degasifier, RO system, H2S Degasifier, Aquaculture, degassed water, Co2 ph, removal of CO2 from water, Deagasification, decarbonation of water, hydrogen ion, particulate matter, municipal water systems, industrial facilities, automated control systems, Ion exchange, cations, anions

Benefits of Pressure Filters for Industrial Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jan 4, 2022 1:00:00 PM

Industrial water systems use water filters to reduce the level of solids in water from:

  • Industrial
  • Semiconductor
  • Manufacturing
  • Refining
  • Oil and Natural Gas Production Processes

The wastewater may contain harmful chemicals to humans, plants, or animals. Three types of filters are commonly used in industrial settings:

Gravity filters, pressure filters, and constructed wetlands. Pressure filters have two variations: multimedia and higher-pressure micron or cartridge filters. Constructed wetlands or natural filters are not often utilized in industrial processes. Based on the requirements to obtain environmental permits and safeguard the ecosystem.

There are many benefits to pressure filtering systems in industrial wastewater. Pressure filters can remove particles down to 0.3 microns in size. They don't clog up as quickly as other filter types, and it's much faster than other types of filtration methods.

Pressure filtering is also very cost-effective because it uses less energy than other methods. Look no further if you're looking for a high-quality industrial water filter that cuts down on operating costs!

Pressure Filters  (Multimedia type) are often used in industrial settings to filter particulates down to 15 microns in size.

They're also very cost-effective due to their energy; pressure filters utilize much less energy than other filtration methods. Pressure filters can include multimedia, a mixture of gravel and sand, multimedia, gravel, sand, and anthracite, or multimedia, which combines gravel, sand, greensand, and anthracite filter media. The variations are dependent on the applications and the need.

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Topics: water quality, water treatment, water plant, media packing, ION Exchange Resin, RO system, Pressure filter, Sand filters, Filter Media, industrial facilities, green sand, Gravity Filters, Constructed Wetlands

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