DELOACH BLOG

How to Remove Nanoparticles from Your Drinking Water‍

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 22, 2022 1:14:33 PM

If you’ve been reading the news lately, you know nanoparticles are not so great. In everything from cosmetics to water filters, nanoparticles have been shown to cause various health problems. But what exactly are nanoparticles, and how can you protect yourself from their harmful effects? Let’s answer these questions and more with this quick guide on removing nanoparticles from your drinking water.

What are Nanoparticles?

Nano is a prefix that’s used to indicate how small something is. In the case of nanoparticles, it means particles less than 100 nanometers. Water filters that use nanoparticles are generally around 0.2 to 0.3 microns or 2,000 to 3,000 nanometers. That’s pretty small. There are some health concerns with nanoparticles. When ingested, they can cause inflammatory reactions in the body, disrupt normal organ function, and lead to a buildup of fluids in the lungs or other organs. A 2017 study found that the number of nanoparticles in drinking water is higher than expected and that using carbon filtration may make some nanoparticles more likely to leach into the water.

Where Are Nanoparticles Found?

Nanoparticles are found in a lot of modern products. Their small size makes them ideal for air and water filters, sunscreens, and cosmetics. It’s important to note that not all nanoparticles are harmful. Some are beneficial. Nanoparticles of silver are often added to water filters to help remove bacteria and other contaminants from drinking water. There are a few places where nanoparticles are most often found. - In water filters - Nanoparticles are often added to water filters to help remove bacteria and harmful contaminants. - In sunscreens - Some sunscreen products contain nanoparticles of zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, and other minerals that provide broad UV protection. - In cosmetics - Many makeups, lip balms, and other beauty products contain nanoparticles of iron, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and other minerals that help preserve the product and provide color.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, About DeLoach Industries, water plant, safety, Safe drinking water, Global, distillation, RO membrane, RO system, particulate matter, filters, municipal water systems, residential well water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, Clean Water, Water Test, Water Test Kit, DeLoach Industries, technology, minerals, temperature, nanoparticles, Cosmetics, Nano, make-up, organ function, contaminants, pressure filters, reverse osmosis, carbon filters, UV filters, activated carbon

PFAS in Drinking Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on May 4, 2022 1:05:00 PM

If you’ve been following the news, you know that there’s a growing problem with PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances).

 

These man-made chemicals are found in everything from clothing to food packaging. While they are inexpensive and stable in products, some of these substances tend to break down into other substances, such as PFAS-methyl tetrahydrofuran. PFASs have been discovered in drinking water across the country, including in parts of the country with very high water tables. As a result, it’s important to learn how to remove contaminants from your drinking water. What should you do if you suspect that there’s a problem with your water? Check the source of the water, test it, and treat it if necessary.

Follow these steps to remove contaminants from your drinking water.

Test Your Water

Although it’s important to know how to remove contaminants in general, it’s even more important to know how to test your water for contamination. A water test kit can help you determine whether there are contaminants in your water and whether they are at a dangerous level. You can purchase water test kits at most grocery stores, hardware stores, and online retailers. Generally, these kits come with the standard set of tests for a home water filtration system, but they also often include tests for certain contaminants. Use these tests to determine whether your water is safe to drink or not. If your water contains contaminants, you need to remove them from your water source. This can be done by digging a deeper well, installing a water filtration system, or getting a water purification system. If your water does not contain contaminants, you don’t need to do anything except continue drinking your water.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, odor control, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, Chemical Odor, Safe drinking water, RO system, filters, Filter Media, residential well water systems, DeLoach Industries, Inc., backwash, Carbon Filter, Micron Filter, Drinking Water, Clean Water, Contaminated Water, Water Source, Sediment Filter, PFA's, Water Test, Water Test Kit

What is Water Demineralization?

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jan 27, 2022 12:54:16 PM

Water demineralization is also called deionization and is a process known as “Ion Exchange.”

In simple terms, water demineralization is “Water Purification.” The process involves removing dissolved ionic mineral solids from a feed-water process, typically for “Industrial” water applications. Still, it can also be utilized to remove dissolved solids from a water process for “Aquaculture,” “Food and Beverage,” and the “Municipal” markets.

Why is demineralization utilized? It can remove dissolved solids to near distilled water quality at a much lower capital and operational cost than other treatment processes such as membrane softening (Reverse Osmosis). Demineralization applies the science known as “Ion Exchange,” which attracts negative and positive charged ions and allows either to attach themselves to a negative ion depending on their respective current negative or positive charge during what is known as a resin cycle. In other technical articles, we will explore and go into more specific details on the science of the ion exchange process. Water that has dissolved salts and minerals has ions, either negatively charged ions known as “Anions” or positively charged ions known as “Cations.” To treat the water and remove these contaminants, the ions in the water are attracted to counter-ions, which have a negative charge. In a demineralization treatment process, there are pressure vessels that hold resin beads which are typically made of plastic. The beads are made from a plastic material with an ionic functional group that allows them to hold and maintain an electrostatic electrical charge. Some of these resin groups are negatively charged, referred to as “Anion” resins, while others hold a positive charge and are called “Cations” resins.

There are different applications to apply Ion exchange technologies, which is why you will often hear the different terminology interchanged like deionization and demineralization. The raw water quality and the specific application will dictate the type of ion exchange process needed. For example, if the water contains a high level of hardness, the water will most likely contain Ca2+ or Mg2+ dissolved solids possessing a positive charge. To replace these hard ions, it is typical to utilize a resin bed with a salt ion like Na+. As the water passes over the resin bead material within the pressure vessel. The hard ions are replaced with the salt ion; therefore, all the hardness within the water is removed. However, the water will now contain a higher concentration of sodium ions, and this must be considered during the evaluation and selection process of the type of resin material to utilize for the specific application. If the water application requires high purity and the removal of as many solids as possible, then the term or process selected is referred to as demineralization.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), media packing, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, decarbonator, degasifier, RO system, H2S Degasifier, Aquaculture, degassed water, Co2 ph, removal of CO2 from water, Deagasification, decarbonation of water, hydrogen ion, particulate matter, municipal water systems, industrial facilities, automated control systems, Ion exchange, cations, anions

Benefits of Pressure Filters for Industrial Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jan 4, 2022 1:00:00 PM

Industrial water systems use water filters to reduce the level of solids in water from:

  • Industrial
  • semiconductor
  • manufacturing
  • refining
  • oil and natural gas production processes

The wastewater may contain harmful chemicals to humans, plants, or animals. Three types of filters are commonly used in industrial settings: Gravity filters, pressure filters, and constructed wetlands. Pressure filters have two variations: multimedia and higher-pressure micron or cartridge filters. Constructed wetlands or natural filters are not often utilized in industrial processes. Based on the requirements to obtain environmental permits and safeguard the ecosystem.

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Topics: water quality, water treatment, water plant, media packing, ION Exchange Resin, RO system, Pressure filter, Sand filters, Filter Media, industrial facilities, green sand, Gravity Filters, Constructed Wetlands

Technology to Remove Per- & Polyfluorinated Substances

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Dec 14, 2021 1:00:00 PM

Per-and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS) have been used for decades in many consumer products, and they are man-made and have a high residual time in the environment. These chemicals are used for various purposes, including nonstick surfaces, heat protection of circuits, water resistance, fighting fire as they are utilized in fire depression foam, and many other industrial applications. The difficult thing about PFAS is that the very reason they work so well on so many manufactured products is why they are so challenging to get rid of or treat once they have entered the environment or water supply. PFAS are being more and more regulated, and requirements are being put in place by many states and agencies to require the treatment and removal of PFAS and safeguard and protect drinking water.

PFAS are soluble in water, and they are not a volatile organic chemical (VOC), so traditional treatment methods such as utilizing an air stripping tower or degasification system are not effective methods to remove PFAS. One of the first technologies to remove PFAS from drinking water and the environment is activated carbon absorption. In recent years, utilizing ion exchange resins has proven effective and is gaining popularity for the treatment method. Ion exchange resins attach and bond with the PFAS and remove it effectively from the water. Some chemicals tested and studied with success include perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOS). In addition to these technologies, reverse osmosis utilizing high-pressure membranes has an 80-90% effective rate and has proven to be technically efficient in removing PFAS. An R.O. process produces a concentrated waste stream.

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Topics: degasification, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, ION Exchange Resin, wastewater, RO system, Deagasification

Ph Probes and Periodic Re-Calibration

Posted by Matthew C. Mossman P.E. on Aug 25, 2021 1:00:00 PM

In many water treatment and chemical processes,

it is a requirement to keep track of the pH of the water or product stream. In DeLoach Industries equipment such as degasification systems, or odor control scrubbers, pH measurement is critical to control the chemical reactions happening within the treatment system. PH is an indication of the acidic vs alkaline nature of a fluid. An acidic fluid will have a greater concentration of H+ hydrogen ions, while an alkaline fluid will have a greater concentration of OH- hydroxide ions. This electrochemical nature is used in the construction, reading, and maintenance of electronic pH probes.

PH probes are generally glass,

and will contain a reference element, and a sensing element. When the pH probe is immersed in the fluid to be measured, the electrical potential difference between the sensing element and the reference element is amplified by electronics, and the resulting voltage is used in a calculation to determine pH from differential electron potential. As a pH probe remains in service, ion exchange will slowly change the electrical potential of the sensing element, the reference element, or both. This happens because the hydrogen ions are small enough to travel through the glass sensor body and cause reference potential shift over time. This is a normal behavior for all pH probes and is the reason why pH probes must be periodically calibrated.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, pH levels of water, iron oxidation, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Alkalinity, ION Exchange Resin, carbon dioxide, gases, RO system, Aqua Farming

Reverse Osmosis-A walk in time

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Aug 21, 2018 8:53:00 AM

DeLoach Industries made history in 1977 at the City of Cape Coral Florida water treatment plant with its large scale “degasification towers” connected to what was to become the first municipal water treatment facility in the United States to deploy the use of reverse osmosis on a large-scale production municipal treatment plant.

The Cape Coral water treatment plant for came on line in 1977 and produced 3 million gallons of water per day (GPD) or 11.35 liters of purified and treated water utilizing the “reverse osmosis” process. By 1985 the plant had expanded as it kept up with growth to produce 15 million gallons per day making it at the time the worlds’ largest “reverse osmosis” water treatment plant facility.

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Topics: water quality, pH levels of water, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Alkalinity, scaling, chlorine, caustic, Decarbonation, wastewater, carbon dioxide, degasifier, RO membrane, RO system, H2S Degasifier

Using a Biological Scrubber to treat & remove contaminants

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Aug 9, 2018 8:18:00 AM

A Biological Scrubber is a wet odor control scrubber that treats and removes contaminants from an air stream. It utilizes caustic typically to control the pH of the re-circulation solution. There are several types of odor control and chemical fume scrubbers on the market today. Each plays a role in treating noxious or corrosive gases in the industry.

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Topics: water treatment issues, odor control, advanced treatment solutions, biological scrubber, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), Chemical Odor, dissolved gases, wastewater, carbon dioxide, degasifier, gases, RO system, H2S Degasifier, what is a scrubber

Industrial Boiler Feed Water For Steam

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 31, 2018 10:01:00 AM

Industrial Boiler feed water in water treatment.

In the USA market alone it is estimated the manufacturing industry consumes over 400 millions of gallons per day (MGD) of water to produce steam. Approximately 60 millions of gallons per day (MGD) of water is sent to the blow down drains in manufacturing. Another approximate 300 millions of gallons per day (MGD) of steam is consumed for direct injection. All this steam required in manufacturing shares the same common need, “water”. But not only water but “purified and treated” water is needed. For without the treatment process US manufacturers would face constant shut downs and increased capital spending driving their cost of goods through the roof. One form of water treatment to protect boilers is degasification and deaeration.

Degasification towers remove

hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2), and quite often dissolved oxygen (DO). Removing dissolved corrosive gases is critical to the life and efficiency of the boiler and if the gases remain in the boiler feed water such as carbon dioxide (CO2) it will create a recipe for disaster, higher operating cost, and a reduced life for the boiler system. The carbon dioxide (CO2) will convert into carbonic acid and form a corrosive condition for the boiler and other critical components. If a boiler system is operating an ion exchange process prior to the boiler the regeneration cost will increase dramatically because the resins will be consumed by the carbon dioxide (CO2). In addition to preserving and increasing the life of the resin the removal of the carbon dioxide (CO2) will elevate the pH of the water without the addition of other chemicals again lowering the operating cost of the system.

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Topics: water treatment issues, degasification, iron oxidation, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, feed water, De-Aeration, steam generation, steam generating boilers, carbon dioxide, steam, decarbonator, boiler system, degasifier, gases, RO membrane, carbonic acid, RO system, H2S Degasifier, Boiler feed water

How To Protect Your Pharmaceutical Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jun 12, 2018 12:00:00 AM

The need to remove dissolved gases from water in the pharmaceutical process is well known within the water treatment industry. However, the method of removing the gases varies and depending on the quality of the water a wrong selection can wreak havoc on your process water equipment, such as the steam boiler or distillation columns. If the water contains high levels of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) than it can form carbonic acid which will attack and corrode both the steam boiler tubes as well as the distillation columns. Removing the dissolved gases by adding a Degasification tower or “Degasifier” will ensure that the dissolved gases like Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) have been removed to acceptable levels of below 7 ppb.  Also utilizing a degasification tower is the most cost-effective way to reduce and eliminate the gases in the water stream, R.O. membranes are used to and require pH adjustment to achieve the same results because of the need to convert the Carbon Dioxide (CO2) into carbonates first.

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Topics: degasification, water treatment, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), dissolved gases, pharmaceutical water, carbon dioxide, degasifier, gases, RO membrane, carbonic acid, RO system

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