DELOACH BLOG

What Is Water Turbidity?

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Mar 18, 2022 1:05:00 PM

Water turbidity refers to how transparent or translucent the water is when examining or testing it for any given use.

Water turbidity can impact food and beverage, municipal, industrial, and aquaculture operations. Turbidity is caused by suspended or dissolved particles in the water that scatter light which causes the water to appear cloudy or even murky.

Different types of particles can cause turbidity, and they include sediments such as silts and clay, very fine inorganic or organic matter, algae or soluble colored organic compounds, and microscopic organisms. Turbidity is measured in a value referred to as NTU, which means Nephelometric Turbidity Unit. The EPA requires a turbidity level no higher than 0.3 NTU in the USA, and if a member of the partnership of safe drinking water, then the level must not exceed 0.1 NTU.

High turbidity can create habitats for other harmful elements, such as bacteria or metals, that can accumulate onto the particles. This increases the health risk for a potable water system. In aquaculture operations, increased turbidity from silts and sediments can be harmful and detrimental to marine life, so it must be removed to safe levels. For the food and beverage industry, the impact of high turbidity can be both a safety concern and a visual and noticeable quality concern because if the turbidity is high, it can alter the physical look of the final product, for example, a distillery.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, Safe drinking water, De-Aeration, decarbonator, Aqua Farming, Fish Farming, Aquaculture, Pisciculture, Deagasification, particulate matter, filters, Sand filters, municipal water systems, industrial facilities, DeLoach Industries, Inc., turbidity

How to Remove PFA'S from your Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Feb 22, 2022 1:02:58 PM

The EPA and other world health organizations have recognized the dangers and health impacts of being exposed to PFASs.

Federal and State regulators are adopting new guidelines and laws for treating and removing PFASs. Often PFASs within potable drinking water systems or groundwater is contaminated with one of the various types of PFASs. There are over 4700 different variations of PFASs that have variations and at least three polyfluorinated carbon atoms.

Well over 10,000 types of PFASs are introduced into products. That can and has impacted the drinking water quality in the USA and other countries. 

So what are PFASs?

PFASs are fluorinated substances that include at least one fully fluorinated methyl or methylene carbon atom. They do not contain (H/Cl/Br/I atoms). However, any chemical with at least a perfluorinated (CF3) or a perfluorinated (CF2) is a PFAS. There are a few exceptions.

Different subgroups include surfactants, per fluorosulfonic acids, perfluorooctane sulfonic, perfluoro carboxylic, and perfluorooctanoic acids. Often referred to as PFOSs and PFOAs.

PFOS, PFOA, and other PFASs are persistent organic pollutants. They are often referred to as the "forever chemicals" because they do not easily break down in the environment. These organic contaminants are found in humans, animals, and our water supplies across the USA.

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Topics: degasification, NSF/ANSI 61, Decarbonation, Safe drinking water, ansi61, Co2 ph, CO2 in water, Deagasification, hydrogen ion, DeLoach Industries, Inc.

What is Water Demineralization?

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jan 27, 2022 12:54:16 PM

Water demineralization is also called deionization and is a process known as “Ion Exchange.”

In simple terms, water demineralization is “Water Purification.” The process involves removing dissolved ionic mineral solids from a feed-water process, typically for “Industrial” water applications. Still, it can also be utilized to remove dissolved solids from a water process for “Aquaculture,” “Food and Beverage,” and the “Municipal” markets.

Why is demineralization utilized? It can remove dissolved solids to near distilled water quality at a much lower capital and operational cost than other treatment processes such as membrane softening (Reverse Osmosis). Demineralization applies the science known as “Ion Exchange,” which attracts negative and positive charged ions and allows either to attach themselves to a negative ion depending on their respective current negative or positive charge during what is known as a resin cycle. In other technical articles, we will explore and go into more specific details on the science of the ion exchange process. Water that has dissolved salts and minerals has ions, either negatively charged ions known as “Anions” or positively charged ions known as “Cations.” To treat the water and remove these contaminants, the ions in the water are attracted to counter-ions, which have a negative charge. In a demineralization treatment process, there are pressure vessels that hold resin beads which are typically made of plastic. The beads are made from a plastic material with an ionic functional group that allows them to hold and maintain an electrostatic electrical charge. Some of these resin groups are negatively charged, referred to as “Anion” resins, while others hold a positive charge and are called “Cations” resins.

There are different applications to apply Ion exchange technologies, which is why you will often hear the different terminology interchanged like deionization and demineralization. The raw water quality and the specific application will dictate the type of ion exchange process needed. For example, if the water contains a high level of hardness, the water will most likely contain Ca2+ or Mg2+ dissolved solids possessing a positive charge. To replace these hard ions, it is typical to utilize a resin bed with a salt ion like Na+. As the water passes over the resin bead material within the pressure vessel. The hard ions are replaced with the salt ion; therefore, all the hardness within the water is removed. However, the water will now contain a higher concentration of sodium ions, and this must be considered during the evaluation and selection process of the type of resin material to utilize for the specific application. If the water application requires high purity and the removal of as many solids as possible, then the term or process selected is referred to as demineralization.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), media packing, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, decarbonator, degasifier, RO system, H2S Degasifier, Aquaculture, degassed water, Co2 ph, removal of CO2 from water, Deagasification, decarbonation of water, hydrogen ion, particulate matter, municipal water systems, industrial facilities, automated control systems, Ion exchange, cations, anions

Technology to Remove Per- & Polyfluorinated Substances

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Dec 14, 2021 1:00:00 PM

Per-and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS) have been used for decades in many consumer products, and they are man-made and have a high residual time in the environment. These chemicals are used for various purposes, including nonstick surfaces, heat protection of circuits, water resistance, fighting fire as they are utilized in fire depression foam, and many other industrial applications. The difficult thing about PFAS is that the very reason they work so well on so many manufactured products is why they are so challenging to get rid of or treat once they have entered the environment or water supply. PFAS are being more and more regulated, and requirements are being put in place by many states and agencies to require the treatment and removal of PFAS and safeguard and protect drinking water.

PFAS are soluble in water, and they are not a volatile organic chemical (VOC), so traditional treatment methods such as utilizing an air stripping tower or degasification system are not effective methods to remove PFAS. One of the first technologies to remove PFAS from drinking water and the environment is activated carbon absorption. In recent years, utilizing ion exchange resins has proven effective and is gaining popularity for the treatment method. Ion exchange resins attach and bond with the PFAS and remove it effectively from the water. Some chemicals tested and studied with success include perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOS). In addition to these technologies, reverse osmosis utilizing high-pressure membranes has an 80-90% effective rate and has proven to be technically efficient in removing PFAS. An R.O. process produces a concentrated waste stream.

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Topics: degasification, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, ION Exchange Resin, wastewater, RO system, Deagasification

Chemical Compatibility

Posted by Matthew C. Mossman P.E. on Oct 29, 2021 1:01:00 PM

In process control systems, it is often required to handle fluids that have a harsh chemical nature. In these cases, it is necessary to be aware of material chemical compatibility. Chemical compatibility is a general term referring to the way a specific chemical interacts with a specific material. This information is taken into consideration when selecting materials of construction for tanks, valves, pipework, tubing, and other devices that may encounter harsh chemicals. Common chemical types that are used in process systems are acids, bases, corrosives and oxidizers, and hydrocarbons. Typical chemical resistant materials include natural and synthetic rubbers, vinyl polymers, fluoropolymers, and stainless steel. In order to determine which materials are compatible with certain chemicals, a chemical compatibility chart is often used. A chemical compatibility chart contains tabulated data about how a given material interacts with a given chemical.

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Topics: degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, caustic, Decarbonation, decarbonator, degasifier, Deagasification

Improving Carbon Dioxide (CO2) & Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Removal By Maintaining Your Decarbonator & Degasifier

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jun 28, 2018 8:15:00 AM

When do you know if your decarbonation system needs service?

When a degasification tower or decarbonator become fouled there are several indicators that identify you may have a problem or its time to clean your system.  If the efficiency of the degasifier has dropped you will see an increase consumption rate of chemicals.  If you are removing less H2S in the degasifier your chlorine consumption will increase.  When you increase the amount of chemical reaction occurring in the water, you will see an increase in the TSS levels and drop in water quality.  As the H2S reacts with chlorine more solids will form and be present in the water and the water quality will diminish.

Another indicator of a fouling condition is the adjustment of pH in the Industrial Water Treatment industry you are required to meet the set standards. As performance of the tower drops the removal of CO2 will also drop leaving a higher pH level than may be desired. A quick inspection to check out the media bed should be performed. Also, do not forget to inspect the distribution system at the top of your tower and remember that all distribution systems are not alike and to inspect the condition of each of them may require additional efforts on your part. With a header lateral system you need to inspect the distribution nozzles but with a Weir or Tray type you will need to check the amount of scale or fouling that is building up on the Weir edge or int the bottom of the pan. If the Weir edge becomes fouled unevenly it will create "Channeling" of the water and an increase in the initial hydraulic load to a concentrated point on the media bed.

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Topics: water treatment issues, blower maintenance, aeration, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, degasifier, Deagasification, decarbonation of water

Safety Precautions When Entering A Water Treatment Tower Or Tank

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Sep 20, 2017 2:36:58 PM

Water treatment towers and storage tanks are high places that require special precautions when entering. While the majority of people who enter these locations for work can be trusted, there are some hazards that make it more important than usual to follow safety procedures.

These locations can get very hot and humid, and can also be filled with harmful chemicals and microorganisms that can cause serious health issues if inhaled or absorbed through the skin. Therefore, the general standard for workplace safety is much higher when entering locations like these.

Make sure you have read and understood the following information about safety when entering a water treatment plant. It will help you understand how to stay safe and protect yourself from harm when entering a water treatment plant. normal installation, maintenance, or even emergency repairs, it is often required to enter into a water treatment tower (degasifier, air stripper, decarbonator, or clear well/ storage tank). When this occurs, full safety protocols should be followed at all times, in accordance with OSHA regulations.  A tower or tank B classification is a "Confined Space" location. For more information visit the OSHA combined space regulations page.

In addition, there are other safety risks that an operator or technician can be exposed to while inside these types of closed locations. The risk can come from fumes of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), chlorine from an injection line, or a lack of oxygen O2. A proper confined space permit should be prepared and only technicians with proper training and certifications should enter into these types of confined spaces.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, odor control, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, biological scrubber, water plant, safety, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), Chemical Odor, media packing, scaling, caustic, Safe drinking water, dissolved gases, wastewater, carbon dioxide, degasifier, gases, Ammonia, what is a scrubber, Hydrogen Sulfide formula, Deagasification, Filter Media, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, Clean Water, Contaminated Water, OSHA

What Makes DeLoach Industries Unique?

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 20, 2017 3:43:33 PM

DeLoach Industries Inc. has been serving the municipal, industrial, and food and beverage industries since 1959.

DeLoach Industries specializes in the design, manufacturing, operations & maintenance of water treatment, wastewater treatment, odor control, and pisciculture/aqua farming systems.

What makes DeLoach Industries Inc. unique is that, as an original equipment manufacturer, we have extensive knowledge and we understand how to engineer, design and manufacture the equipment you need. We are different from traditional fabrication shops in that they will typically build something specific to your drawing but if there is a problem they may not understand the process involved or even how to correct the problem.

We serve each customer on a project by project basis to fully understand your needs. We offer full in house engineering and CAD design support services, manufacturing services including operation & maintenance support, and field services including annual service contracts on all DeLoach and other brand water treatment equipment.

 

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, pH levels of water, aeration, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, fiberglass, About DeLoach Industries, fabrication, biological scrubber, Chemical Odor, media packing, pH levels, Decarbonation, De-Aeration, decarbonator, boiler system, distillation, degasifier, RO system, H2S Degasifier, Fish Farming, Aquaculture, Pisciculture, Biological Odor Control Scrubber, Biological odor control, removal of CO2 from water, Deagasification, decarbonation of water, Sand filters, Filter Media, municipal water systems, greensand, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water

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