DELOACH BLOG

The Basics of Water Decarbonation

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Feb 25, 2019 1:04:12 PM

Basics of water decarbonation for dissolved organic carbon.

The water treatment industry continues to develop and evolve and over the past two decades there have been many new developments in technology and even more refinement in existing technologies such as "Degasification". The evolution and advancement of water treatment have been driven by the constantly increasing demand from an increase in population that demand cost-effective solutions and recognition to improve safety with the implementation of NSF 61 standards.

All human cultures on our planet share a single commonality and that is the dependency on water to survive.

Many existing technologies such as "Degasification" have evolved with higher efficiency to meet the demand changes and provide safety to consumers and to the systems. Degasification refers to the removal of dissolved gases from liquids and the science to degasify water is based upon a chemistry equation known as "Henry's Law". The "proportionality factor" is called Henry's law constant" and was developed by William Henry in the early 19th century. Henry's Law states that "the amount of dissolved gas is proportional to its partial pressure in the gas". The most "cost" effective method to perform degasification is with the packed vertical tower called a "Degasifier” or “Decarbonator”.

The key words in this previous sentence for owners, operators, and engineers to focus on is "the most cost-effective" as there is no other process more cost-effective at removing dissolved gases at the lowest cost than the use of a Degasifier or decarbonator. The process of degasification is simple enough to understand. Water is pumped to the top of a vertically constructed tower where it first enters the tower through some type of distribution system at the same time there is a cross current air flowing up from the bottom by a blower located at the bottom of the tower and the air encounters the water and is exhausted at the top of the tower through an exhaust port. There are various types of distributions systems and we will explore these in later discussions. Once the water enters the top of the tower and passes through the distribution system it then travels by gravity downward. The next thing the water encounters is some type of media packing. There are various forms of media packing offered in the degasification industry and each type can offer higher performance or have the ability to deter fouling. The selection of the type, size, and volume is where the “experience, engineering and understanding of each application” comes in to play.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, About DeLoach Industries, water plant, NSF/ANSI 61, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), media packing, pH levels, scaling, caustic, Decarbonation, Safe drinking water, dissolved gases, carbon dioxide, decarbonator, boiler system, degasifier, carbonic acid, H2S Degasifier, Dissolved organic Carbon, co2 dissolved in water

Reverse Osmosis-A walk in time

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Aug 21, 2018 8:53:00 AM

DeLoach Industries made history in 1977 at the City of Cape Coral Florida water treatment plant with its large scale “degasification towers” connected to what was to become the first municipal water treatment facility in the United States to deploy the use of reverse osmosis on a large-scale production municipal treatment plant.

The Cape Coral water treatment plant for came on line in 1977 and produced 3 million gallons of water per day (GPD) or 11.35 liters of purified and treated water utilizing the “reverse osmosis” process. By 1985 the plant had expanded as it kept up with growth to produce 15 million gallons per day making it at the time the worlds’ largest “reverse osmosis” water treatment plant facility.

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Topics: water quality, pH levels of water, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Alkalinity, scaling, chlorine, caustic, Decarbonation, wastewater, carbon dioxide, degasifier, RO membrane, RO system, H2S Degasifier

Industrial Odor Control: The Do’s and Don’ts

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 26, 2018 8:32:00 AM

Avoid problems with calcium chlorite, and corrosive gasses with your odor control scrubber.

When planning or designing an odor control system one should pay close attention to several key variables that can cause havoc on a chemical odor control scrubber when trying to treat hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gases.   The need for odor control occurs in many different forms and it is important to have a good understanding of the process that is creating the odorous or corrosive gas and the need for odor control & air emissions treatment.

First, begin to identify

all the potential obstacles that may creep up later after the chemical odor or corrosive gas control system goes online like acid or caustic consumption. As an example, chemical odor control systems that are designed for water treatment for the municipal industry are typically needed and attached to a degasification or decarbonation process which is often needed to treat hydrogen sulfide (H2S). However, many times designers may not pay close enough attention to the type of water process that is available to use for “make-up” water for the chemical scrubber and the addition of caustic can create scaling or fouling. This unknown variable of the makeup water quality can lead to a complete tower shutdown if the chemical scrubber distribution and media bed scales or fouls. The most commonly used chemicals for a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) scrubber are either chlorine in the form of sodium hypochlorite or caustic in the form of caustic soda. Both of these chemicals are common to a water treatment facility and are already in place for the adjustment and control of pH.

The makeup water plays a significant role in the operation of a chemical scrubber.

When water containing high levels of hardness levels is used as the source for the makeup water your chemical scrubber can become fouled and scaling can occur in a matter of hours depending on the alkalinity and salts within the water. Solidification can occur from the scaling when combining sodium hypochlorite and raw feed water at certain pH ranges and these ranges are normally the range needed to achieve peak performance. Calcium chloride will form and your chemical odor control scrubber will become a solid chunk of calcium chlorite making the ability for water or air to pass freely through the media packing next to impossible. No matter what type of media packing is utilized in the odor control or gas scrubber it can foul and scale if the water chemistry is incorrect.  Trust me when I say “been there and done that”!  I have seen operators who have allowed a chemical scrubber to become out of balance with pH control and completely solidify the tower column to the degree that neither air nor water passage is possible. With ammonia scrubbers, the problem can still occur but are different with different sets of parameters.

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Topics: odor control, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, biological scrubber, water plant, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), calcium carbonate, media packing, pH levels, Alkalinity, Langilier index (LSI), scaling, chlorine, caustic, ION Exchange Resin, Safe drinking water, dissolved gases, De-Aeration, carbon dioxide, oxygen, degasifier, gases, H2S Degasifier, calcium chlorite

Saving Your Ion Exchange Resin In Boiler Feed Water By Utilizing Decarbonation

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on May 22, 2018 12:00:00 AM

Extending the life of your ion exchange resin in boiler feed water applications

Did you know that when producing steam, that it is most effectively accomplished by utilizing a decarbonation process? Decarbonation and Degasification is the most economical way to process in fluent water pre-Ion exchange treatment through a vertical packed tower called a decarbonator or often times referred to as a degasifier.  This is the most economical method to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) and Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) to prevent the formation of carbonic acid and other corrosive conditions is Degasification and Decarbonation which will extend the life of the ion exchange resin.  If CO2 levels remain high in the inlet feed water to the ion exchange system the resin beds whether cation or anion will require more frequent regeneration and your chemical usage and cost will rise.

In industrial applications it’s easy to overlook,

and often there is not enough focus on the need to select the right type of decarbonation or degasification system to assure that the process water treatment system will perform at the highest optimal level.  For water filtration when the primary process is membrane filtration of as often referred to “reverse osmosis”, too little attention is given to the need to properly remove CO2 from the process to lower the pH and adjust the alkalinity. 

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Topics: water treatment issues, scaling, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin

Don't Foul Your Chemical Odor Control Treatment System.

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on May 3, 2018 12:00:00 AM

When operating a chemical odor control treatment system it is important to make sure you have a good handle on the makeup water supply system in terms of its water quality. Having the LSI number out of balance can create havoc to the odor control treatment system in a matter of hours or over a short duration of time.

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Topics: odor control, calcium carbonate, Chemical Odor, media packing, Langilier index (LSI), scaling, chlorine, caustic

Safety Precautions When Entering A Water Treatment Tower Or Tank

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Sep 20, 2017 2:36:58 PM

Water treatment towers and storage tanks are high places that require special precautions when entering. While the majority of people who enter these locations for work can be trusted, there are some hazards that make it more important than usual to follow safety procedures.

These locations can get very hot and humid, and can also be filled with harmful chemicals and microorganisms that can cause serious health issues if inhaled or absorbed through the skin. Therefore, the general standard for workplace safety is much higher when entering locations like these.

Make sure you have read and understood the following information about safety when entering a water treatment plant. It will help you understand how to stay safe and protect yourself from harm when entering a water treatment plant. normal installation, maintenance, or even emergency repairs, it is often required to enter into a water treatment tower (degasifier, air stripper, decarbonator, or clear well/ storage tank). When this occurs, full safety protocols should be followed at all times, in accordance with OSHA regulations.  A tower or tank B classification is a "Confined Space" location. For more information visit the OSHA combined space regulations page.

In addition, there are other safety risks that an operator or technician can be exposed to while inside these types of closed locations. The risk can come from fumes of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), chlorine from an injection line, or a lack of oxygen O2. A proper confined space permit should be prepared and only technicians with proper training and certifications should enter into these types of confined spaces.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, odor control, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, biological scrubber, water plant, safety, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), Chemical Odor, media packing, scaling, caustic, Safe drinking water, dissolved gases, wastewater, carbon dioxide, degasifier, gases, Ammonia, what is a scrubber, Hydrogen Sulfide formula, Deagasification, Filter Media, DeLoach Industries, Inc., Drinking Water, Clean Water, Contaminated Water, OSHA

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