DELOACH BLOG

Benefits of Pressure Filters for Industrial Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jan 4, 2022 1:00:00 PM

Industrial water systems often use water filters to reduce the level of solids in the water coming from industrial, semiconductor, manufacturing, refining, or even processes like oil and natural gas production. The wastewater may contain chemicals that are harmful to humans, plants, or animals. There are three types of filters that are commonly used in industrial settings: Gravity filters, pressure filters, and constructed wetlands. Pressure filters have two variations which include multimedia and higher-pressure micron or cartridge filters. Constructed wetland or natural filters are not often utilized in industrial applications based upon the requirements to obtain environmental permits and to safeguard the ecosystem.

 

There are many benefits to pressure filtering industrial wastewater. Pressure filters can remove particles down to 0.3 microns in size, they don't clog up as easily as other filter types, and it's much faster than other types of filtration methods. Pressure filtering is also very cost-effective because it uses less energy than other methods do. If you're looking for a high-quality industrial water filter, look no further!

 

Pressure Filters  (Multimedia type) are often used in industrial settings to remove particles down to 15 microns in size. They're also very cost-effective due to the amount of energy they use; pressure filter utilize much less energy than other filtration methods. Pressure filters can include multimedia which is a mixture of gravel and sand, multimedia that combines gravel, sand, and anthracite, or multimedia that combines gravel, sand, greensand, and anthracite. The variations are dependent on the applications and the need.

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Topics: water quality, water treatment, water plant, media packing, ION Exchange Resin, RO system, Pressure filter, Sand filters, Filter Media, industrial facilities, green sand, Gravity Filters, Constructed Wetlands

What Technology to use to Remove Per- & Polyfluorinated Substances

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Dec 14, 2021 1:00:00 PM

Per-and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS) have been used for decades in many consumer products, and they are man-made and have a high residual time in the environment. These chemicals are used for various purposes, including nonstick surfaces, heat protection of circuits, water resistance, fighting fire as they are utilized in fire depression foam, and many other industrial applications. The difficult thing about PFAS is that the very reason they work so well on so many manufactured products is why they are so challenging to get rid of or treat once they have entered the environment or water supply. PFAS are being more and more regulated, and requirements are being put in place by many states and agencies to require the treatment and removal of PFAS and safeguard and protect drinking water.

PFAS are soluble in water, and they are not a volatile organic chemical (VOC), so traditional treatment methods such as utilizing an air stripping tower or degasification system are not effective methods to remove PFAS. One of the first technologies to remove PFAS from drinking water and the environment is activated carbon absorption. In recent years, utilizing ion exchange resins has proven effective and is gaining popularity for the treatment method. Ion exchange resins attach and bond with the PFAS and remove it effectively from the water. Some chemicals tested and studied with success include perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOS). In addition to these technologies, reverse osmosis utilizing high-pressure membranes has an 80-90% effective rate and has proven to be technically efficient in removing PFAS. An R.O. process produces a concentrated waste stream.

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Topics: degasification, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, ION Exchange Resin, wastewater, RO system, Deagasification

Ph Probes and the Importance of Periodic Re-Calibration

Posted by Matthew C. Mossman P.E. on Aug 25, 2021 1:00:00 PM

In many water treatment and chemical processes,

it is a requirement to keep track of the pH of the water or product stream. In DeLoach Industries equipment such as degasification systems, or odor control scrubbers, pH measurement is critical to control the chemical reactions happening within the treatment system. PH is an indication of the acidic vs alkaline nature of a fluid. An acidic fluid will have a greater concentration of H+ hydrogen ions, while an alkaline fluid will have a greater concentration of OH- hydroxide ions. This electrochemical nature is used in the construction, reading, and maintenance of electronic pH probes.

PH probes are generally glass,

and will contain a reference element, and a sensing element. When the pH probe is immersed in the fluid to be measured, the electrical potential difference between the sensing element and the reference element is amplified by electronics, and the resulting voltage is used in a calculation to determine pH from differential electron potential. As a pH probe remains in service, ion exchange will slowly change the electrical potential of the sensing element, the reference element, or both. This happens because the hydrogen ions are small enough to travel through the glass sensor body and cause reference potential shift over time. This is a normal behavior for all pH probes and is the reason why pH probes must be periodically calibrated.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, pH levels of water, iron oxidation, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Alkalinity, ION Exchange Resin, carbon dioxide, gases, RO system, Aqua Farming

Decarbonation the Removal of CO2 from Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Aug 16, 2021 2:08:54 PM

The basics of water decarbonation, the removal of CO2 from water

the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). The need to remove (CO2) is essential in most Aquaculture, Municipal, Industrial, and Food & Beverage Processes To understand you must familiarize yourself with Henry’s Law.

Henry's Law defines the method and proportional relationship between the amount of a gas in solution

in relationship to the gases partial pressure in the atmosphere. Often you will see and hear various terms like degasification, decarbonation, aeration, and even air stripping when discussing the removal of dissolved gases and other convertible elements from water. Understanding the impacts that Carbon Dioxide (CO2) can have on both equipment and aquatic life provides the basic reasons why the need to decarbonate water, exists. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) can exist naturally in the raw water supply or be the results of ph control and balance. In either case the the process called Decarbonation or Degasification provide the most cost effective and efficient manner to reduce or tally remove (CO2) from the water. In addition to Carbon Dioxide (CO2), water can contain a variety of other contaminants that may impact the removal efficiency of the Carbon Dioxide. A variety of elements as well as dissolved gases such as oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). A full analytical review of the water chemistry is required to properly design and size the “Water Treatment” process.

Breaking the bonds in water to release a dissolved gas

such as carbon dioxide (CO2) you must change the conditions of the vapor pressure surrounding the gas and allow the gas to be removed.  There are many variables to consider when designing or calculating the “means and methods” of the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). When I refer to the means and methods. I am referring to the design of a decarbonator and its components. The means equals the size and type (Hydraulic load) of the decarbonator and the “method” equals the additional variables such as cubic foot of air flow (CFM) and “Ratio” of the air to water to accomplish the proportional condition needed to remove the carbon dioxide (CO2).

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Topics: water treatment issues, degasification, pH levels of water, aeration, iron oxidation, water treatment, water plant, bicarbonate, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, dissolved gases, De-Aeration, wastewater, carbon dioxide, oxygen, decarbonator, degasifier, gases, carbonic acid, H2S Degasifier, removal of CO2 from water

Forced Draft Degasification Pre and Post Cation And Anion Exchange

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Oct 23, 2018 7:49:53 AM

In the production and purification of water for industry

there are many types of different processes available to remove harmful minerals and gases from the water stream but the most effective process and most cost effective from both a capital investment and operational cost is a “Forced Draft Degasification System” (Degasifier).

Degasification is used in a wide range of water processes for industrial and municipal applications which extend from the production of chemicals to the production of semiconductors and in all applications the need to remove contaminants from the water and dissolved gases is key to achieving the end results needed in the industrial water process. Water from the ground often contains elements such as calcium carbonate, manganese, iron, salts, hydrogen sulfide, and sulfur just to name a few of the basic contaminants and these naturally occurring elements can cause serious damage and consequences to process equipment such as boiler systems, piping, membranes, and cation and anion exchange resins used in the demineralization process.

Calcium carbonate can dissolve in water under certain pH ranges forming carbonic acid and releasing carbon dioxide (CO2) gases. These gases are not only very corrosive to equipment like boiler feed systems and boiler tubes but also attack the actual resin beds found in cation and anion softening and demineralization system causing an increase in regeneration and chemical consumption and resin bed replacement.

By incorporating a Force Draft Degasification system you can remove dissolved gasses

like CO2 and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to as low as 99.999% and improve the cation and anion system performance, extend the resin bed life, and lower the operating cost of the water treatment process.

Quite often Forced Draft Degasification is utilized “post” treatment to also remove newly formed dissolved gases prior to entering the boiler feed system to prevent corrosion damage within the tubes and feed system and pumps. These gases are easily removed with the forced draft degasifier at a much lower cost than chemical additives or liquid cell degasification that requires higher capital cost and much higher operating cost.

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Topics: water treatment issues, degasification, pH levels of water, iron oxidation, water treatment, water distribution system, aluminum, water plant, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), calcium carbonate, media packing, pH levels, Langilier index (LSI), Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, dissolved gases, feed water, De-Aeration, wastewater, carbon dioxide, decarbonator, degasifier, carbonic acid, H2S Degasifier

Industrial Boiler Feed Water For Steam

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 31, 2018 10:01:00 AM

Industrial Boiler feed water in water treatment.

In the USA market alone it is estimated the manufacturing industry consumes over 400 millions of gallons per day (MGD) of water to produce steam. Approximately 60 millions of gallons per day (MGD) of water is sent to the blow down drains in manufacturing. Another approximate 300 millions of gallons per day (MGD) of steam is consumed for direct injection. All this steam required in manufacturing shares the same common need, “water”. But not only water but “purified and treated” water is needed. For without the treatment process US manufacturers would face constant shut downs and increased capital spending driving their cost of goods through the roof. One form of water treatment to protect boilers is degasification and deaeration.

Degasification towers remove

hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2), and quite often dissolved oxygen (DO). Removing dissolved corrosive gases is critical to the life and efficiency of the boiler and if the gases remain in the boiler feed water such as carbon dioxide (CO2) it will create a recipe for disaster, higher operating cost, and a reduced life for the boiler system. The carbon dioxide (CO2) will convert into carbonic acid and form a corrosive condition for the boiler and other critical components. If a boiler system is operating an ion exchange process prior to the boiler the regeneration cost will increase dramatically because the resins will be consumed by the carbon dioxide (CO2). In addition to preserving and increasing the life of the resin the removal of the carbon dioxide (CO2) will elevate the pH of the water without the addition of other chemicals again lowering the operating cost of the system.

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Topics: water treatment issues, degasification, iron oxidation, water treatment, water distribution system, advanced treatment solutions, water plant, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, feed water, De-Aeration, steam generation, steam generating boilers, carbon dioxide, steam, decarbonator, boiler system, degasifier, gases, RO membrane, carbonic acid, RO system, H2S Degasifier, Boiler feed water

Industrial Odor Control: The Do’s and Don’ts

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 26, 2018 8:32:00 AM

Avoiding problems with calcium chlorite, corrosive gasses with your odor control scrubber.

When planning or designing an odor control system one should pay close attention to several key variables that can cause havoc on a chemical odor control scrubber when trying to treat hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gases.   The need for odor control occurs for many different forms and it is important to have a good understanding of the process that is creating the odorous or corrosive gas and the need for the odor control & air emissions treatment.

First begin to identify

all the potential obstacles that may creep up later after the chemical odor or corrosive gas control system goes on line like acid or caustic consumption. As an example, chemical odor control systems that are designed for water treatment for the municipal industry are typically needed and attached to a degasfication or decarbonation process which are often needed to treat hydrogen sulfide (H2S). However, many times designers may not pay close enough attention to the type of water process that is available to use for “make-up” water for the chemical scrubber and with the addition of caustic this can create scaling or fouling. This unknown variable of the make up water quality can lead to a complete tower shutdown if the chemical scrubber distribution and media bed scales or fouls. The most commonly used chemicals for a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) scrubber are either chlorine in the form of sodium hypochlorite or caustic in the form of caustic soda. Both of these chemicals are both common to a water treatment facility and already in place for the adjustment and control of pH.

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Topics: odor control, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, biological scrubber, water plant, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), calcium carbonate, media packing, pH levels, Alkalinity, Langilier index (LSI), scaling, chlorine, caustic, ION Exchange Resin, Safe drinking water, dissolved gases, De-Aeration, carbon dioxide, oxygen, degasifier, gases, H2S Degasifier, calcium chlorite

Scrubber Pack Media

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 19, 2018 3:53:58 PM
Watertower Clean (wistia video)

Many types of water treatment systems depend on some type of media to provide the best performance required as it relates to water treatment and waste water treatment. For use in reverse osmosis there is a reliance on membranes which act as filters to separate the solids from the water. For ion exchange there are “resins” whether AION or CATION the resins works to treat hard and corrosive water. Degasification and decarbonation towers both require an internal media and sometimes this is referred to as “Random Packing” or “Loose Fill Media” and in this process the media acts like a traffic cop directing traffic.

In this case it directs the water on its way down and through a towers internals where it is constantly reshaping the water droplets over and over again forcing gas molecules to come to the surface edge of the water where they are removed. Carbon filters also require a media which is of course “Carbon”. The carbon media acts like a sponge absorbing the contaminants that you wish to remove from the water until it is saturated and must be replaced or regenerated. Even sand filters or pressure filters require a media.

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Topics: degasification, water treatment, water plant, media packing, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, feed water, wastewater, decarbonator, gases, RO membrane

Why Remove Carbon Dioxide (CO2) From Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jun 7, 2018 12:00:00 AM

The importance of removing Carbon Dioxide in water!

Carbon dioxide exists naturally in nature as free CO2 and can be found in many water sources from lakes, streams, or other surface water bodies. Carbon dioxide occurs naturally in small amounts (about 0.04 percent) in the Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a minor part of the air that humans breathe. Free carbon dioxide in water causes an ionic load problem for ion exchange. Resin treatments such as ion resins or continuous deionization (CDI) systems. Having excess CO2 in water, causes several problems for the ion exchange process that includes an increase of regeneration, reduction in resin bed life, and of course more down time of the equipment for maintenance. To avoid costly damage to your equipment, it is important to monitor and maintain the efficiency of your system.

Decarbonators are the most cost effective method to remove and strip the CO2 from a water process to protect equipment, lower operating cost, helps prevent corrosion, and to works to raise the pH of the water in your system.

The most economical way to remove free carbon dioxide in water is by utilizing a process called “Decarbonation” or sometimes referred to as “Degasification”. Utilizing the decarbonation process will remove CO2 levels to 99% or higher. DeLoach Industries offers a wide range of decarbonation and degasification equipment for municipal, pharmaceutical, food and beverage, and the industrial markets. With over 60 years of experience in the water treatment industry, for more information or to learn more contact the professionals at DeLoach Industries Inc. at (941) 371-4995.

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Topics: degasification, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, carbon dioxide, CO2 in water, excess co2, hydrogen ion

Saving Your Ion Exchange Resin In Boiler Feed Water By Utilizing Decarbonation

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on May 22, 2018 12:00:00 AM

Extending the life of your ion exchange resin in boiler feed water applications

Did you know that when producing steam, that it is most effectively accomplished by utilizing a decarbonation process? Decarbonation and Degasification is the most economical way to process in fluent water pre-Ion exchange treatment through a vertical packed tower called a decarbonator or often times referred to as a degasifier.  This is the most economical method to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) and Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) to prevent the formation of carbonic acid and other corrosive conditions is Degasification and Decarbonation which will extend the life of the ion exchange resin.  If CO2 levels remain high in the inlet feed water to the ion exchange system the resin beds whether cation or anion will require more frequent regeneration and your chemical usage and cost will rise.

In industrial applications it’s easy to overlook,

and often there is not enough focus on the need to select the right type of decarbonation or degasification system to assure that the process water treatment system will perform at the highest optimal level.  For water filtration when the primary process is membrane filtration of as often referred to “reverse osmosis”, too little attention is given to the need to properly remove CO2 from the process to lower the pH and adjust the alkalinity. 

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Topics: water treatment issues, scaling, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin

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