DELOACH BLOG

Decarbonation the Removal of CO2 from Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Aug 16, 2021 2:08:54 PM

The basics of water decarbonation, the removal of CO2 from water

the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). The need to remove (CO2) is essential in most Aquaculture, Municipal, Industrial, and Food & Beverage Processes To understand you must familiarize yourself with Henry’s Law.

Henry's Law defines the method and proportional relationship between the amount of a gas in solution

in relationship to the gases partial pressure in the atmosphere. Often you will see and hear various terms like degasification, decarbonation, aeration, and even air stripping when discussing the removal of dissolved gases and other convertible elements from water. Understanding the impacts that Carbon Dioxide (CO2) can have on both equipment and aquatic life provides the basic reasons why the need to decarbonate water, exists. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) can exist naturally in the raw water supply or be the results of ph control and balance. In either case the the process called Decarbonation or Degasification provide the most cost effective and efficient manner to reduce or tally remove (CO2) from the water. In addition to Carbon Dioxide (CO2), water can contain a variety of other contaminants that may impact the removal efficiency of the Carbon Dioxide. A variety of elements as well as dissolved gases such as oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). A full analytical review of the water chemistry is required to properly design and size the “Water Treatment” process.

Breaking the bonds in water to release a dissolved gas

such as carbon dioxide (CO2) you must change the conditions of the vapor pressure surrounding the gas and allow the gas to be removed.  There are many variables to consider when designing or calculating the “means and methods” of the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). When I refer to the means and methods. I am referring to the design of a decarbonator and its components. The means equals the size and type (Hydraulic load) of the decarbonator and the “method” equals the additional variables such as cubic foot of air flow (CFM) and “Ratio” of the air to water to accomplish the proportional condition needed to remove the carbon dioxide (CO2).

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Topics: water treatment issues, degasification, pH levels of water, aeration, iron oxidation, water treatment, water plant, bicarbonate, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Decarbonation, ION Exchange Resin, dissolved gases, De-Aeration, wastewater, carbon dioxide, oxygen, decarbonator, degasifier, gases, carbonic acid, H2S Degasifier, removal of CO2 from water

Water Degasification in Pisciculture

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Feb 11, 2020 9:36:29 AM

The need to remove harmful elements from water such as Hydrogen Sulfide and Carbon Dioxide

from water in the pisciculture and aquaculture market is extremely important. In order to achieve maximum results, the industry utilizes a treatment technology called “Degasificationand controls the pH precisely to maximize results. When utilizing equipment such as the DeLoach Industries degasification systems the hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide levels can be removed to 99.999% ug/l.

pH control with water degasification in water treatment is very important for the aquaculture and the pisciculture market. In addition, there are a host of other organic and inorganic elements found in water both naturally occurring and manmade that require removal during some part of the water treatment process and pH plays a significant role on the effectiveness of the treatment process.

Every application of degasification depends on pH adjustment to maximize results. As an example, the treatment of water may require the removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to protect the species during the growth period. Hydrogen sulfide can be removed either as a “free” gas or requires the conversion of sulfides into (H2S) as a gas they you will quite often also see the need to adjust pH of the water chemistry to maximize both the removal and the conversion to increase the efficiency of the equipment being utilized to remove the hydrogen sulfide such as a degasification tower or commonly called a degasifier.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Decarbonation, carbon dioxide, oxygen, decarbonator, degasifier, H2S Degasifier, Aqua Farming, Fish Farming, Aquaculture, Pisciculture

Aqua Farming

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Sep 11, 2018 9:09:00 AM

To enhance and control production and quality

of seafood that is grown and harvested the industry is increasing its focus on the construction of in house aquaculture fish farms commonly referred to as aqua farming. The most popular species of aqua farming continues to be salmon, tilapia, catfish, and carp. With the increase interest in the United States aqua farming facilities have been developing in parts of southern Florida where climate conditions and water conditions are favorable.

When considering several types of fish species to grow for harvest it is important to keep in mind the need to control the quality of the water. If the aqua farm is intended to utilize man made tanks they will depend upon a constant flow of incoming water. If the aqua farm is focusing on salmon than both the water quality and water temperature plays a major role on mortality rates and production yields of the operation.

Having water with too high of hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, total Organic carbons, and even turbidity can increase mortality rates among the younger fish species and is especially critical to salmon.

Having high levels of metals

such as Iron that is identified as either “ferric” (Fe-) or “ferrous” (FE+2) and is naturally occurring within the Florida waters and other parts of the US will cause significant damage to young salmon species because the metal accumulates within the gills of the fish causing suffocation. Other metals are also detrimental to fish including copper, aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, Lead, manganese, mercury just to name a few and the water quality must be evaluated and tested in the early stages of design to anticipate the required types of process systems needed.

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Topics: water treatment issues, water quality, degasification, pH levels of water, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), pH levels, Alkalinity, Decarbonation, carbon dioxide, oxygen, decarbonator, degasifier, carbonic acid, H2S Degasifier, Aqua Farming, Fish Farming, Aquaculture, Pisciculture

Industrial Odor Control: The Do’s and Don’ts

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jul 26, 2018 8:32:00 AM

Avoid problems with calcium chlorite, and corrosive gasses with your odor control scrubber.

When planning or designing an odor control system one should pay close attention to several key variables that can cause havoc on a chemical odor control scrubber when trying to treat hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gases.   The need for odor control occurs in many different forms and it is important to have a good understanding of the process that is creating the odorous or corrosive gas and the need for odor control & air emissions treatment.

First, begin to identify

all the potential obstacles that may creep up later after the chemical odor or corrosive gas control system goes online like acid or caustic consumption. As an example, chemical odor control systems that are designed for water treatment for the municipal industry are typically needed and attached to a degasification or decarbonation process which is often needed to treat hydrogen sulfide (H2S). However, many times designers may not pay close enough attention to the type of water process that is available to use for “make-up” water for the chemical scrubber and the addition of caustic can create scaling or fouling. This unknown variable of the makeup water quality can lead to a complete tower shutdown if the chemical scrubber distribution and media bed scales or fouls. The most commonly used chemicals for a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) scrubber are either chlorine in the form of sodium hypochlorite or caustic in the form of caustic soda. Both of these chemicals are common to a water treatment facility and are already in place for the adjustment and control of pH.

The makeup water plays a significant role in the operation of a chemical scrubber.

When water containing high levels of hardness levels is used as the source for the makeup water your chemical scrubber can become fouled and scaling can occur in a matter of hours depending on the alkalinity and salts within the water. Solidification can occur from the scaling when combining sodium hypochlorite and raw feed water at certain pH ranges and these ranges are normally the range needed to achieve peak performance. Calcium chloride will form and your chemical odor control scrubber will become a solid chunk of calcium chlorite making the ability for water or air to pass freely through the media packing next to impossible. No matter what type of media packing is utilized in the odor control or gas scrubber it can foul and scale if the water chemistry is incorrect.  Trust me when I say “been there and done that”!  I have seen operators who have allowed a chemical scrubber to become out of balance with pH control and completely solidify the tower column to the degree that neither air nor water passage is possible. With ammonia scrubbers, the problem can still occur but are different with different sets of parameters.

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Topics: odor control, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, biological scrubber, water plant, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), calcium carbonate, media packing, pH levels, Alkalinity, Langilier index (LSI), scaling, chlorine, caustic, ION Exchange Resin, Safe drinking water, dissolved gases, De-Aeration, carbon dioxide, oxygen, degasifier, gases, H2S Degasifier, calcium chlorite

Steam Process Water Systems

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jun 26, 2018 8:06:00 AM

Degasification towers remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon dioxide (CO2), and quite often dissolved oxygen (O2).  In process water systems where the water will be used to heat and turn into steam it is critical that the water chemistry be fully understood and a properly designed treatment system utilizing degasification, decarbonation, or deaeration to be applied. Removing dissolved gases is critical to the life and efficiency of the boiler and allowing dissolved gases such as carbon dioxide to remain in the water is a recipe for disaster and reduced life. The (CO2) will convert into carbonic acid and form a corrosive condition for the boiler and other critical components. In addition, the removal of the (CO2) will elevate the pH of the water without the addition of caustics. The selection of what type of degasification tower system should be based on the specific applications, site conditions, and water chemistry. DeLoach Industries understands the many different requirements needed for each individual Industrial Water Treatment system. For more information or to learn more contact the professionals at DeLoach Industries Inc. at (941) 371-4995.

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Topics: De-Aeration, carbon dioxide, oxygen, steam, decarbonator, degasifier, carbonic acid

Deaeration Vs. Decarbonation

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jun 14, 2018 8:00:00 AM

The term De-Aeration refers to a specific process utilized to remove carbon dioxide as well as dissolved oxygen from a water stream. Typically associated with boiler feed water systems and utilized as a method to remove Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Oxygen (O2) from the water prior to entering the boiler. The Decarbonation system also removes Carbon Dioxide (CO2) from the water and typically does not target the removal of Oxygen (O2). A De-Aeration system utilizes steam which enters at the bottom of the tower. The inlet feed water is heated, as close to saturation temperature as possible utilizing a minimum pressure drop and a limit on the vent. This ensures the best thermal operating efficiency of the tower.

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Topics: media packing, Decarbonation, De-Aeration, carbon dioxide, oxygen, steam, decarbonator

Dearation in Water

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on May 31, 2018 12:00:00 AM

Removing gases to protect your boiler

The process of removing dissolved gases from feed water to steam-generating boilers is often referred to as “Deaeration”. During the deaeration process dissolved oxygen (02) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are removed prior to entering the boiler. If the gases are not removed prior to reaching the boiler system, the boiler will experience serious corrosion damage. The gases, when in contact with the metallic equipment will form oxides (rust) and it will attach to the walls of the piping and tubes and over time completely shut down the boiler. The dissolved carbon dioxide combines with the water and forms carbonic acid that also further enhances the corrosion process.

Most deaerators utilize steam to enhance the removal of the dissolved gases and levels are typically reduced to 7 ppb by weight or less for the oxygen (02) and the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). For a system only needing CO2 removal then a decarbonator is typically used as it operates without the need for steam and for much less operating cost. For more information or to learn more contact the professionals at DeLoach Industries Inc. at (941) 371-4995.

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Topics: Decarbonation, dissolved gases, feed water, De-Aeration, steam generating boilers, carbon dioxide, oxygen, steam, decarbonator, boiler system

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