DELOACH BLOG

Sour Gas Degasification

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Aug 28, 2018 12:31:07 PM

The Term Sour Gas

refers to any natural gas or other gas that contains high levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The H2S is typically naturally occurring and found in deposits of natural gas and when there are concentrations above 5.7 milligrams per cubic meter or 4 milligrams per cubic meter when tested under standard temperature and pressure. At these levels the industry classifies the gas as “Sour.” Of course there are variations to this classification dependent upon agency an organization.

A Sour gas is not to be confused with an acidic gas 

although one could be both a sour gas is strictly defined by having large quantities of hydrogen sulfide and is usually accompanied by having mercaptans which adds to the foul smell and odor. The term is often used in the oil refinery business and when gases contain sour gas the process to remove the hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans is referred to as “Sweetening”. The most common method to “sweeten” and remove the sour gas is by processing the gas through an “amine process” which removes the harmful gas.

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Topics: odor control, aeration, water treatment, advanced treatment solutions, biological scrubber, water plant, odor control scrubber, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), Chemical Odor, pH levels, Decarbonation, dissolved gases, wastewater, carbon dioxide, degasifier, gases, Amine, H2S Degasifier

Reduce AMINE Consumption in Water Process Systems

Posted by Anthony DeLoach, President on Jun 19, 2018 8:05:00 AM

Ammonia (AM) is a common water pollutant that significantly impacts the water process industry. It is not just polluting water bodies but also aqua wells and humidifiers. Generally, AM is produced from human sweat and urine and created from synthetic ammonia in industrial process systems.

Ammonia has three types of amines – primary, secondary, and tertiary – all are toxic for humans and aquatic life.


  • Primary Amine has two carbon and one nitrogen atom also called methylamine or CHNH2.
  • Secondary Amine has two nitrogen atoms with no carbon atom between them, also called Dimethylamine or CH2(NH)CH3.
  • Tertiary Amine has three nitrogen atoms with no carbon atoms between them; thus, it’s called Trimethylamine or CH3C(NH)CH3.

In natural conditions, primary Amide bacteria produce Amide under high-temperature conditions. In an aqueous solution and soil environments with high pH levels (>6).

Primary amide can form by the dehydrogenation of nitriles, such as acetonitrile, which are further oxidized to form acetic acid. 

Primary amide form by alkaline hydrolysis of nitro compounds such as 2-nitrophenol.

Process systems often need to recognize when the Degasification or Decarbonation system is failing or underperforming.

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Topics: Decarbonation, decarbonator, degasifier, Amine, Ammonia, Deagasification, Filter Media, distribution system, blower motor, process system, frequent inspections

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